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Folks, we appreciate your interest in the Radiation Network, and thank you for your support.  You may send us an email, but we will not be able to respond to most.  Instead, this Message page will address issues that you raise.  So please read this page and the archived Messages in lieu of, or before emailing us.  We update it occasionally, and it will answer a lot of your questions.   Email:    tim@radiationnetwork.com

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Update: 11/29/16 - Community Monitoring

While the Radiation Network offers nationwide, and even global, real time radiation monitoring, within that umbrella, local Community Monitoring can take place.  As an example, we have a "sub-network" within the Radiation Network called the "Pilgrim" group which has set up a series of Radiation Monitoring Stations around the Pilgrim Nuclear Station in Plymouth, Massachusetts.  See the Map at right showing familiar Cape Cod facing back at the Pilgrim Plant (denoted by the Nuclear Site symbol) on the west shore of Cape Cod Bay.   The Pilgrim group has set up 6 monitoring stations, consisting of 2 of the Pancake and 4 of the Standard tubed Geiger counters, strategically surrounding the Pilgrim Plant on all sides.

Similar sub-networks exist within the Radiation Network, including the 11 station Indian Point Group focused around the Nuclear Plant of the same name located on the Hudson River in southern New York state, along with the 4 station Millstone Group surrounding the similarly named Nuclear plant in Connecticut at the east end of Long Island Sound.

By working within the umbrella of the Radiation Network, these sub-networks have a couple of powerful capabilities.  First, they can use the integrated Chat within the Radiation Network to communicate in real time between Monitoring Stations within their networks, to discuss any Radiation Alerts or the logistics of monitoring.  Secondly, a sub-network can create a custom, zoomed-in Map of their monitoring region, just like the sample shown here for Pilgrim, and upload that to their community website, offering real time radiation readings to all interested parties in their respective regions.

Update: 3/28/16 - Florida Wave

The Raider station on our network, located in Orange Park, Florida, a suburb of Jacksonville, has been triggering occasional Radiation Alerts beginning on about March 10th, peaking at 200 CPM on March 13th, as seen in his graph at right.  For context, he is operating a CDV-700 Survey Meter, but affixed with an ultra-sensitive replacement Pancake probe, of the same count rate as found in the Inspector line of Geiger counters.  So at his near sea level elevation, it combines for a normal background reading around 30 CPM.  His Geiger counter is logistically setup indoors, on a south facing window sill.

The reason for the elevated swings in radiation levels is unknown.  Discussion on our live Chat forum has cited Florida nuclear power plants, including the Crystal River Nuclear generating station, located on the Gulf Coast, 120 miles to the southwest, and to pursue that theory, the Raider station is planning a mobile radiation survey around the plant.  Perhaps that nuclear plant theory explains the lone spike of 200 CPM.

But study the graph, and you will perceive a daily cycle of swings in radiation levels, tending to peak by mid to late morning, followed by troughs in the evening.  We have seen these graph patterns before - see updates below for Shell Beach Station 8/2/14 and Post Falls 3/22/14.  These wavy patterns are often associated with changing Radon gas levels in the outdoor environment, which can be exacerbated indoors when non-ventilated space allows Radon to accumulate.

Update: 10/21/15 - Apples and Oranges - "Veterans Today" article

Have received so many emails with links to a "Veteran's Today" article, that it warrants response.  Basically, the author of the article concludes that EPA radiation monitoring stations are recording massively elevated radiation readings compared to the norm, because at least in part, he defines the norm as those background levels detected by a Digilert 100 Geiger counter.  Problem is, the EPA stations are not operating Digilert 100 Geiger counters, nor anything close to that, and not all radiation detectors are created equal.  True, a Digilert's normal background reading is about the 5 to 20 CPM that the author cites, but the normal readings for an EPA station are many multiples of that.  Without going into detail, EPA stations use both larger and specialized radiation collectors, so really, the comparison to the Digilert is not as much apples and oranges, but more like watermelons to cherries.

For readers of the Veterans Today periodical, please write in and urge the author to make that correction.  He needs to redefine the "norm" for those EPA stations using whatever that number is based on the specific radiation detectors that they operate.  Thank you.

P.S. While the reporting of EPA data is a good thing, yes, relating their readings to those of our Radiation Network is a problem.  One of the attributes of the Radiation Network, among others, is that our station operators use the same Geiger counters that any of us would typically acquire for our own personal safety, or what our first responders in cities like New York are also using, so that the radiation readings detected are very relate-able.

Update: 9/21/15 - False Alert in New Jersey

The Oyster Crk 3 Monitoring Station broadcast an Alert this evening which turned out to be false.  The station operator had recently undergone a PET Scan and is still radioactive from the imaging tracer.   We have disabled Oyster Crk 3 until the effect has worn off.  A station is supposed to unplug in such situations, but this one got by - sorry. 

Update: 6/25/15 - Radiation detected on Oregon coast

During the early afternoon of June 11, a station in Port Orford, Oregon momentarily detected a radiation level as high as 800 CPM.  The elevated levels lasted not more than a couple of minutes, but surged well into the hundreds of CPM against a normal background reading of about 26 CPM.

For context , the Geiger counter in use is the ultra-sensitive pancake-tubed PRM-9000.  Logistically, the monitoring is done indoors with alternating open and closed windows, while the house is located only 350 yards from the Pacific Ocean.

The pattern of the minute by minute spreadsheet activity tends to rule out a software glitch as the cause, and a Radon storm seems unlikely because those graphs typically demonstrate a prolonged wavy pattern.  Nor do we believe this was a hardware defect with the PRM, which showed normal readings on its display both before and after the 800 CPM detection.

Our best explanation of this genuine Radiation Alert is of Fukushima origin.  The actively precipitating fringe of the Jet Stream was roughly overhead at the time, and this looks like a momentary detection of radioactive particles having made their way to the Oregon coast.

Update: 4/23/15, 4:40 P.M. - "Houston, we have a problem."

During the evening of April 17th, a Monitoring Station in Houston, Texas set off the Alert system of the Radiation Network, detecting counts as high as 120 CPM, versus its normal background reading of 33 CPM.  The station operates the Inspector+ Geiger counter, an ultra-sensitive pancake-tubed model, logistically set up indoors at the time.  You can see from its graph that the ensuing radiation detection over the following day or so exhibited a wavy pattern, finally subsiding to normal readings after about two days. 

The station operator explained, "The device was in the same place all the time and nobody visited, nor did I bring anything new into the house during that time.  The device also seems to be okay since the reading decreased by itself."  The Houston station believes the explanation is weather related, adding that a lot of rain and strong storms had passed through.

A check of weather at the first alert indicated no rain at the time, however, the Jet Stream was passing above Texas, parting into two fingers directly over Houston.  We have seen other elevated radiation detections on our network apparently correlating with the active fringes of an overhead jet stream, so that seems to be the best explanation.

So the obvious next question is, "What did the Jet Stream drop over Houston?"  Radon daughter products?  Fukushima isotopes?  Or was this a release from the South Texas Nuclear Power Plant located 75 miles to the southwest? Unfortunately, there was no rainfall at the time, nor air filter collector setup, so no chance to subject collection to the Poor Man's Radioactive Isotope ID test.

Some members studied the Jet Stream maps further and traced its origin to south Japan, but in my review, there was a considerable break in the stream.  Conclusion: This appears to be a genuine detection, and the graph pattern closely resembles others that are believed to be Radon related, although other constituents can't be ruled out, in the absence of a collectable sample to test.

 

Update: 12/14/14, 8:06 A.M. - Record breaking Radiation detection in Texas Panhandle!

On the late afternoon of December 4th, a long time running station located in Borger, Texas, northeast of Amarillo, set off our Alert system, recording readings as high as 25,000 CPM!!!   In fact, the radiation levels were well into the 000's for so many minutes that the software almost could not keep up.  See the graph at right.  For context, he is operating the pancake-tubed Inspector Alert indoors from the second story of his home.  His normal baseline background is about 40 CPM.

A storm was rolling through at the time, accompanied by rain, and the Jet Stream map shows its active precipitating fringe directly over the panhandle at the time of the alert - see map below.  Wind was from the south.  The fact that it was raining set up an opportunity to collect a water sample to confirm that the radiation was related to the storm.  So the operator did successive 10 minute average scans of the exact same sample of rainwater to first confirm its radioactive nature, then secondly to measure its radiation level, and thirdly (and of critical importance) to measure the decay rate to to the end of ruling in or out various isotopes of known half life. i.e. the "Poor Man's Isotope Identifying Test", using a Geiger counter.

Results: The rainwater was in fact radioactive, starting out around 300 CPM, and its radioactive constituent decayed very rapidly, indicating a half life of a few hours, such that by the following morning, the same rainwater sample measured no more than background.

Conclusions: Because of the short half life, many fission by-products can be ruled out, and so the initial tendency would be to implicate naturally occurring Radon washout.  However, we have never seen raw environmental readings of Radon daughters this high - yes, commonly in the 00's of CPM, even over 1,000 CPM, but never to our knowledge averaging well into the 000's and in this case, as high as 25,000 CPM.

So the working theory we have now, (if not Radon washout), among the station operator and a few of our members involved in the analysis that evening, is a possible detection of some sort of radioactive release from the Pantex plant located only 25 miles to the southwest.  Pantex is involved in the disassembly of nuclear weapons at that site.  Interestingly, this same Texas monitoring station recorded a possible radiation detection from Pantex on a couple of previous occasions - search the Archives for the Updates of 4/15/13 and 11/24/12.

Thanks again for your support. Tim Flanegin

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